where to stay in vancouver cover photo - view of english bay and the west end

You Can’t Stay at Our Parents’ House…

This guide to where to stay in Vancouver is part 2 of our 5-Part Not Your Ordinary Vancouver Series.

When Kim and I visit, our decision on where to stay in Vancouver has an easy answer:

We stay with our parents.

Sorry, dear reader, but our parents said that you can’t stay with them. you’re going to have to look elsewhere.

To lighten the blow we’re going to help you find a nice place with this guide to where to stay in Vancouver. It lists our picks for the best neighborhoods and ranks them across various criteria. All you have to do is pick the criteria that matter most to you and you have it: the perfect spot for you.

Who knows?

It may turn out even better for you than staying with our parents.

Quick Pick

For Impatient or Indecisive Folks

Quickly, for those of you who don’t want to read through our ratings and descriptions of Vancouver’s best neighborhoods, or who can’t decide for yourselves and want us to tell you where to stay in Vancouver, here you go:

Stay in the West End.

Nobody will go wrong by staying there. It’s Vancouver’s best compromise of location and neighborhood feel, is family and everyone else friendly.

Vancouver Neighborhood Map

We’ve colored the best Vancouver neighborhoods and put the others we don’t recommend as much in grey. Click the icon on the top left to see the legend.

Note that these aren’t the official neighborhood boundaries, but roughly where we’d recommend staying within each of them.

Save this map to your phone’s Google Maps in just two clicks by following the steps in our guide to Our Favorite Google Maps Tips and Tricks.

Treasure Map: For the locations of our 40 favorite spots in Vancouver that you can save to your phone’s Google Maps, see our Treasure Map below.

The Best Vancouver Neighborhoods

In alphabetical order, here are our top-recommended Vancouver neighborhoods with ratings, pros and cons, highlights, and top picks for where to stay each.

Corner coffee shop and lady walking along the street on Commercial Drive in Vancouver

Commercial Drive:
For a Real Local Experience

Commercial Drive doesn’t deserve its name because it’s not particularly commercial. The neighborhood has stuck to its roots more than any other Vancouver neighborhood listed here.

As for what those roots are… well, they’re varied.

Commercial Drive had the most eclectic mix of cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds of any Vancouver neighborhood.

Ratings

Affordability:
8
Casual Eats:
8
Fine Dining:
6
Local Feel:
9
Nightlife:
6
Outdoorsiness:
5
Attractions:
4
Shopping:
4

Pros

  • Very few tourists.
  • Eccentricity. Nowhere in Vancouver has a wider variety of people, restaurants, and shops.

Con

  • Bad base. Since it’s a few kilometers east of all of Vancouver’s attractions, it’s not the best base for exploring the whole city.

Hot Spots

Best Places to Stay

Airbnb’s your best bet because there are little to no hotels around Commercial Drive. Try to stay near the Broadway and Commercial SkyTrain station

For a discount on your first ever Airbnb stay, click this link.

Mid-day bustle in Vancouver's downtown central business district.
Downtown’s always busy with workers, travelers, and shoppers.

Downtown Centre:
Strictly Business (and Tourists)

On a cloudy day when you can’t see the mountains, you’d have a hard time distinguishing Vancouver’s downtown center from that of many other cities. It’s a bunch of business towers, brand name hotels, restaurants, cars, and people. 

But every direction from downtown is the rest of Vancouver, which definitely isn’t like any other city, even on a cloudy day.

Ratings

Affordability:
4
Casual Eats:
7
Fine Dining:
9
Local Feel:
5
Nightlife:
9
Outdoorsiness:
5
Attractions:
10
Shopping:
9

Pro

  • Location. It’s the center of the city, the hub of all transport, and full of restaurants and shopping.

Cons

  • Franticness. Traffic, people, noise all day long.
  • Expense. Being the easiest place to stay in Vancouver makes it the most expensive too.
  • Nobody lives here. It’s a land of office workers, tourists, and mall shoppers.

Hot Spots

  • Robson Street and Pacific Centre Mall for big-brand shopping
  • Cultural centers like the Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, and Orpheum Theatre.
  • The Waterfront. Here at tourist central, you can watch the cruise ships come in and seaplanes take off with the North Shore mountains as a backdrop.

Best Places to Stay

  • Classic Vancouver: Before all the modern skyscrapers overshadowed it, copper-topped Hotel Vancouver stood head and shoulders above the city. The hotel still stands out as a classy place to stay.
  • Top-of-the-Line: L’Hermitage Hotel is the #1-rated hotel no matter which hotel review site you check.
  • Budget: You’re better off keeping to your budget in the West End unless you find an amazing one-time deal or get something on points.
  • Hostel: The Urban Hideaway Guesthouse lives up to its name. It’s located in a heritage home surrounded by downtown towers, kind of like the house in the movie, Up!
  • Airbnbs: Here are the Airbnbs in Downtown Vancouver.
Tourists taking photos of the famous steam clock in Gastown
For some surprising history about the steam clock, see our Vancouver travel tips.

Gastown:
The Vibrant Old Quarter

Gastown is more of a quarter than a neighborhood. It’s Vancouver’s historical quarter.

Not many people live in the old buildings. Those that do are mostly work-at-home artists and designers and their cats. And homeless people.

There aren’t many places to stay here either but if you find and choose one you’ll have plenty of designer and souvenir shops, art galleries, and some of Vancouver’s best pubs and restaurants at your doorstep. And homeless people.

Ratings

Affordability:
6
Casual Eats:
6
Fine Dining:
8
Local Feel:
6
Nightlife:
9
Outdoorsiness:
4
Attractions:
8
Shopping:
8

Pro

  • Character. Even though Gastown was Disneyfied to appeal to tourists (as revealed in our Vancouver Travel Tips), its old buildings and cobbled roads create an old-time ambiance.

Cons

  • Seedy. Right beside the drug-plagued Downtown Eastside.
  • Urban. Far from any beaches (except un-swimmable Crab Park) and parks.

Hot Spots

  • Water Street, Gastown’s main strip of souvenir shops, restaurants, and boutiques.
  • The Steam Clock. It’s a clock. Many people take photos of it and it is literally a hot spot with the steam and all.

Best Places to Stay

  • Full of Memories: The Victorian Hotel has such a rich history, which its interior manages to maintain, that it was a featured stop for our entertaining Forbidden Vancouver tour.
  • Lofty Locations: Most Airbnbs in Gastown are funky lofts with lofty prices.
  • Hostel: The Cambie is famously a dirty and dirt-cheap bar for young people. The hostel is the same.
A local's bike at Kitsilano Beach in Vancouver
Kits Beach is one of Chris’s favorite beaches in Vancouver.

Kitsilano:
Canada-lifornia

Kitsilano (or Kits) is the place to stay in Vancouver for a California-style beach vibe.

You’ll have a hard time finding an unfit person. Even the babies here wear Lululemon and Arcteryx (both born-in-Vancouver brands).

Ratings

Affordability:
6
Casual Eats:
7
Fine Dining:
7
Local Feel:
8
Nightlife:
5
Outdoorsiness:
8
Attractions:
6
Shopping:
7

Pros

  • Closer to the University of British Colombia (UBC) and all the West Side Beaches
  • Its relaxed, active, outdoorsy feel will compel you to put on your yoga pants and join in.

Con

  • Poor public transit. The least well-served by public transit of all our picks for best neighborhoods in Vancouver.

Hot Spots

  • Kits Beach, which explodes with activity—volleyball, paddleboarding, swimming in the outdoor pool, basketball, suntanning—in the summer.
  • 4th Ave between Vine and Burrard is the birthplace of Lululemon and has tons of yoga shops and studios, outdoor apparel stores, and good restaurants. Maenam is one of our favorites.
  • Granville Island’s markets, theaters, and shops are just down the street.

Best Places to Stay

Kits doesn’t have any hotels, so stay at an Airbnb.

  • Basements and backyards: You’ll mostly find basement or backyard guest suites in Kits. Look in this area for the optimal location.
  • Rent a Room: Look for a private Airbnb room in the area we’ve zoomed into here.
  • Hostel: The HI-Jericho Beach is closest to Kits… but not really close to anything, not even bus stops, except the beach.
Mount pleasant cafe Le Marche St George in Vancouver
Le Marche St. George is a quintessentially Mount Pleasant cafe stocking local food products and serving healthy eats and strong coffee.

Mount Pleasant:
Hipster Hop-Land

Mount pleasant has reached Stage 2 of the global hipster neighborhood development scale.

In Stage One, original hipsters creep into the cracks of downtrodden neighborhoods and multiply, setting up vegan restaurants, breweries, cafes, and vintage shops.

In Stage Two, those original hipsters tone down, people with too much money to be hipsters move in and drive up prices, and it becomes the go-to neighborhood in town.

And Stage Three… I don’t know yet. We’ll see soon enough!

Ratings

Affordability:
7
Casual Eats:
8
Fine Dining:
7
Local Feel:
8
Nightlife:
6
Outdoorsiness:
6
Attractions:
6
Shopping:
7

Pros

  • Most hipster of all the neighborhoods, which for most (but not all) people is a good thing.
  • Easy airport access, especially the closer to Cambie Street you stay.

Con

  • Far from the beaches and parks.

Hot Spots

  • Brewery Creek below Broadway (towards the mountains) has enough buzzing microbreweries to keep you buzzed.
  • Main Street is the, well, main street, of Mount Pleasant. Between 8th and 25th are most of the restaurants, cafes, and shops.

Best Places to Stay

Decide whether to stay closer to Cambie Street, for a more convenient location, or Main Street, to be embedded among the hipster hotspots. The two are 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) apart.

  • An Eclectic Mix: Airbnbs in Mount Pleasant include artist’s studios, a surf shacks, a “Ganja Yoga retreat,” heritage houses, and regular ol’ apartments.
  • Hostel: The C&N is the only hostel nearby, but it’s not in the nicest area, nor is the hotel that nice itself.
Greenhorn cafe shop front in the West End neighborhood of Vancouver
The Greenhorn Cafe is one of our favorites in the city, as we share in our Vancouver in 11 Q&As travel blog.

The West End:
Downtown’s Low-Key Locale

Not to be confused with Vancouver’s West Side (the residential neighborhoods between Main St. and UBC) and West Vancouver (a suburb by the mountains), the West End is a dense downtown neighborhood.

While the rest of downtown has developed dramatically over the last 30 years the West End has mostly remained its same low-key, lower cost neighborhood self.

Ratings

Affordability:
7
Casual Eats:
8
Fine Dining:
7
Local Feel:
8
Nightlife:
7
Outdoorsiness:
7
Attractions:
8
Shopping:
6

Pros

  • Relaxed and residential. Most of the streets are local-traffic-only.
  • In the middle. Between the nature of Stanley Park and the beaches and the action and attractions of the rest of downtown.

Cons

  • It’s not on any SkyTrain route and only has a couple of buses along Davie and Robson Streets.
  • Not as hip. Rarely do any hip new restaurants or shops open in the West End.

Hot Spots

  • English Bay Beach and Sunset Beach
  • Stanley Park and the Seawall
  • Western Robson Street is a hub for the city’s best Japenese and Korean restaurants
  • Davie Street, or “Davie Village,” Vancouver’s everyone’s-welcome gay-borhood.

Best Places to Stay

  • Historic Beachside: The ivy-covered Sylvia Hotel right by English Bay, the Seawall, and Davie and Denman streets’ restaurants.
  • Retro Chic: Burrard Hotel straddles the West End and Downtown for what we believe to be is a perfect location.
  • Charm and Hospitality: If those two adjectives tickle your fancy, so will the West End Guesthouse.
  • Airbnb: Look for an Airbnb west of Denman and close to Davie Street.
  • Hostel: The quiet, but social and well-located Downtown Hostel is a good bet for backpackers who want to seize the day rather than party all night.
Street life in Yaletown on a sunny summer's day.

Yaletown:
Yuppie’s Paradise

Yuppie’s (young urban professionals) gravitate to Yaletown so they can dress fancy and go to the fancy spin studios, smoothie bars, restaurants, IV therapy centers, and all other such places that they can afford now that they have “real jobs” but no kids yet.

Ratings

Affordability:
8
Casual Eats:
8
Fine Dining:
6
Local Feel:
9
Nightlife:
6
Outdoorsiness:
6
Attractions:
8
Shopping:
6

Pro

  • Nightlife. Vancouver’s not famous for its nightlife (and for good reason), but Yaletown’s the place to be if you want to party. It’s the place to start a night out then head over to the clubs on Granville Street or bars in Gastown.

Cons

  • Lack of charm. The area is as charming as the nearly-identical glass apartment buildings that have sprouted from it.
  • Expense. You don’t get as much bang for your buck in Yaletown. People here are more price insensitive than other parts of the city, and the prices reflect that.

Hot Spots

  • The ex-warehouse, now lofty and cool area along Hamilton and Mainland Streets between Robson and Davie.
  • The seawall section by David Lam Park and along False Creek for stretching your legs, tanning your skin.

Best Places to Stay

  • Style Central: The Opus Hotel epitomizes Yaletown.
  • Hostel: A couple blocks of away on Granville Street, which is party by night and dirty by day (but super central), the Samesun is Vancouver’s most popular hostel.
  • Airbnbs: See what Airbnbs are available in Yaletown and help a yuppie pay off their mortgage.

Not the Best Areas to Stay in Vancouver

Seaplanes taking off in Coal Harbour in Vancouver.
You’re close to seaplanes and Stanley Park in Coal Harbour but far from where the cool people hang out.

Coal Harbour

Coal Harbour is Yaletown but instead of being full yuppies and yuppie-related businesses, it’s empty (because of absentee wealthy Asian owners).

For some reason, all the other blogs on where to stay in Vancouver have agreed it’s the “place to stay” if you’re going to take a cruise.

Why?

Because it’s close to the convention center?! That’s what tons of other bloggers say, but Gastown, Downtown Centre, and even Yaletown and the West End are just as close. Those blogs are just regurgitating each others’ words because there’s not enough nice to say about Coal Harbour.

Chinatown / Crosstown

The Chinatown / Crosstown area has some fantastic restaurants and bars, but newcomers may not feel as comfortable here as in other Vancouver neighborhoods because it is the grittiest of them all.

You will see people injecting drugs in themselves here and you won’t get much of a discount for staying here compared to the neighboring areas.

Fairview, False Creek, and South Granville

We’re grouping these three separate but contiguous neighborhoods together because they’re all comfortable but less character-full and less-happening than neighboring Mount Pleasant and Kits.

Olympic Village

This area’s called Olympic Village because it was nothing but warehouses until it was completely redeveloped into athlete’s accommodation for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics then converted into apartments.

We give this neighborhood a bronze medal because there’s not a lot to it aside from those apartments and a couple of brewpubs. Look to stay in Mount Pleasant or Kits before settling on here.

VIews of downtown from the North Shore
You can get from the North Shore to Downtown by SeaBus; it just takes time.

The North Shore

Accommodation in the North Shore is cheaper than many other Vancouver neighborhoods listed here, closer to the mountain trails and parks, and “only” a public SeaBus away from downtown Vancouver.

But be careful making those compromises.

What money you save you’ll be paying with time to get anywhere in the city. And if you want to spend most of your time in the mountains, actually go to the mountains—check out Squamish—instead of trying to have your cake and eat it too.

Vancouver treasure map Google Maps screenshot
Get the map to our favorite Vancouver locations, with tips for each, right on your phone’s Google Maps.

Free Vancouver Treasure Map

Find of 40 our favorite Vancouver restaurants, cafes, attractions, and more directly on Google Maps when you’re traveling, even offline!

It’s free and super easy: just one click!

Where to Stay in Vancouver F.A.Q.

It’s helpful to know the following info before making a final decision on where to stay in Vancouver.

Our other Vancouver guides—Dos and Don’ts for Getting Around, Travel Tips to Know Before You Go, and 11 Vital Q&As—have a lot more info, so we’re going to keep it short here.

Girl standing on the street waiting to cross in downtown Vancouver
No car, no problem. Vancouver is as walkable as NYC.
How spread-out is Vancouver?

Because of all these darn mountains, bays, creeks, and rivers, there’s precious little space for poor Vancouverites to live on. We’re squished (by Canadian standards).

This means that no matter where you decide to stay in Vancouver, it won’t take you long to get anywhere. For instance, you can walk from any corner of downtown to the other in less than 45 minutes.

Since Vancouver has so little space, parking sucks and so can traffic, so renting a car’s a bad idea while you’re in town. Only consider renting one if you’re planning a day trip, like up the Sea-to-Sky Highway.

How safe/dangerous is Vancouver?

The number of homeless people and drug addicts in Vancouver may shock you, especially the closer you get to the Downtown Eastside epicenter along East Hastings, but don’t let that shock turn to fear.

Everywhere in Vancouver is safe, even those areas.

You can safely walk anywhere at any time of day or night in Vancouver.

Walking along a Vancouver bridge at night

What’s the best way to get around Vancouver?

Vancouver doesn’t have Uber so your best bet to get around is to A) Walk B) Bike and C) Take public transit like everyone else.

Again, don’t rent a car for your time in Vancouver.

And see our Dos and Don’ts for Getting Around Vancouver for more tips.

Kim riding her bike in Vancouver

Other Useful Resources

Vancouver travel tips cover image

Next!

What to Do Once You Know Where to Stay?

Good question!

Check out the other four posts of our 5-part Not Your Ordinary Vancouver Series (plus find links to some more hidden posts):

  1. The 11 Questions You Want Answered Before Visiting Vancouver
  2. Vancouver Travel Tips You Likely Haven’t Heard Already
  3. Where to Stay in Vancouver: The Best Neighborhoods, Ranked (Done!)
  4. 7 Things Everyone Actually Must Do if They Visit Vancouver
  5. Our Favorite Non-Touristy Things to Do in Vancouver

Disclosure: Whenever possible, we use special links that earn us a cut if you pay for stuff we'd recommend anyway. It costs you nothing, so we’d be crazy not to.

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